Archives

  • Vol. 39 No. 1 (2021)

    This issue contains articles detailing reasons for animal admision into wildlife rehabilitation centers throughout Canada, evaluating the efficacy of 16 surfactants for oil removal from feathers, avian anesthesia and analgesia, critical elements to consider when working with the media, and ethical considerations in wildlife medicine.

  • Vol. 38 No. 1 (2020)

    This issues contains articles about the importance of One Health in wildlife rehabilitation, creating successful wildlife education programs in a public school setting, considerations for photo sharing, enrichment in wildlife rehabilitation, an overview of wildlife radiology including important techniques for use with wild patients, and post-release survival of rehabilitated red-tailed hawks.

  • Vol. 37 No. 1 (2019)

    This issue contains articles on how to encourage self-feeding behaviors in wildlife undergoing rehabilitation; a preliminary study looking at the role habitat modification plays in chronic stress in deer mice; the selection of appropriate irrigants for wound treatment; a new approach for turtle shell repair using foil tape; and gross pathology findings of herons and egrets at a rehabilitation center.

  • Vol. 36 No. 1 (2018)

    This issue contains articles on the use of social media in wildlife rehabilitation; best practice guidelines for euthanasia methods in wild species; encouraging self-feeding behavior in waterfowl; a review of capture myopathy in avian species; the use of a prefabricated carport kit for building a raptor enclosure; and a discussion of the selection process for ambassador animals, including postmortem findings of captive raptors at a center in Oregon.

  • Young Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 35 No. 2 (2017)

    This issue contains articles about the role of setting limits on patient intake and its effect on operational capacity and animal welfare; understanding the critical nature of patient assessment and triage; the extra-label use of medications in wildlife, including implications for release; and an update on the Formula for Nesting Songbirds (FoNS©) for 2018. The issue revisits the role of ethics in wildlife rehabilitation, with an annotated Wildlife Rehabilitator's Code of Ethics offering context and insight for their use. A case study of traumatic brain injury in Morepork owls details the diagnostic and treatment options used. 

  • Northern Elephant Seals (Mirounga angustirostris). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 35 No. 1 (2017)

    This issue contains papers about the rehabilitation of an elephant seal pup with a skeletal abnormality; practical solutions for mitigating wildlife conflicts with urban waterfowl; nutritional imbalances in wildlife; the role of urinalysis in wildlife rehabilitation; and the legal framework for veterinarians working with wildlife.

  • Northern flying squirrel (Glaucomis sabrinus). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 34 No. 1 (2016)

    This issue contains articles related to the impact of outdoor cats and dogs on wildlife mortality and rehabilitation patient outcomes; the role of natural history in husbandry and wildlife care; the physiological effects of stress; an overview of Baylisascaris procyonis; and the relation of body size to rehabilitation success in sea turtles.

  • American red squirrel (Tamiascurius hudsonicus). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan

    Vol. 33 No. 1 (2015)

    This issue contains papers on developing solutions for inefficiencies in animal care; understanding how the Minimum Standards for Wildlife Rehabilitation checklist can be used for self-evaluation; response planning for rehabilitation centers, particularly in regard to infectious disease management; release considerations for fresh-water turtles; and two case studies—one of a young squirrel with tumor-like masses and the second of a wild turkey with an abnormal liver.

  • Golden–crowned kinglets (Regulus satrapa). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan

    Vol. 32 No. 2 (2014)

    This issue contains articles on the impact of cats on bird populations; a diet preparation for young columbiformes and songbirds; a discussion of wildlife values; an alternative gavage diet for seabird species; and a case study of nodular skin lesions in passerines.

  • White–tailed Deer Fawn (Odocoileus virginanus). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 32 No. 1 (2014)

    This issue contains papers on the rehabilitation of coyotes; the antibody titers produced by a commonly used vaccination protocol in wild raccoons for canine distemper and the parvoviruses; the first report of Borrelia burgdorferi-positive ticks on a raptor admitted for rehabilitation in British Columbia; a treatment protocol for hypernatremia in a white-tailed deer fawn; and an update on the Formula for Nesting Songbirds (FoNS©).

  • Adult male whip–poor–will (Caprimulgus vociferus). rtwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 31 No. 2 (2013)

    This issue contains a three-part discussion of domestic animal attacks on wildlife, including the traumatic injury caused, treatment options, and advise for educating pet owners. Also in this issue is a paper on patient outcomes in wild birds with neurological traumatic injury; treatment protocol combining western veterinary medicine with traditional Chinese veterinary medicine and physical therapy in a red fox kit; and an interactive educational program about the connection between DDT, bioaccumulation, and peregrine falcons.

  • Eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis). Artwork by Leslie Pultz

    Vol. 31 No. 1 (2013)

    This issue contains papers on the diagnostic testing and treatment of shorebirds and ducks found in varying stages of paralysis consistent with avian botulism; emergency short-term housing for beavers during an oil spill response; effective use of social media in wildlife rehabilitation; and a case study of cryptosporidium-like disease in cliff swallows.

  • Blackburnian warblers (Setophaga fusca). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 30 No. 2 (2012)

    This issue contains papers on epidemiology and the important contribution of wildlife rehabilitators to wildlife disease epidemiology; ideas for procuring medical supplies on a limited budget; minimum basic knowledge for wildlife rehabilitators, standardized terminology for patient records and outcomes; the use of media with high profile patients; an overview of release criteria for rehabilitated wildlife; and an update on the Formula for Nesting Songbirds (FoNS©).

  • Barred Owl (Strix varia).  Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 30 No. 1 (2012)

    This issue contains papers on the common medical problems seen in Virginia opossum in rehabilitation; the role of season and age in barred owl admissions in Maine; rules and regulations in the use of volunteers and interns at wildlife rehabilitation facilities; eagle care at the Grey Snow Eagle House; solutions for solubility problems with powered milk replacers; a case study of steatitis in a common loon; and an update on the Formula for Nesting Songbirds (FoNS©).

  • Virginia opossum with young. (Didelphis virginiana). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 29 No. 2 (2011)

    This issue contains papers on the housing and handling of raptors, including behavioral aspects and stress reduction techniques; the treatment of an American kestrel with traumatic brain injury; the rehabilitation of gray fox; successful patagium treatment after long-term wing immobilization; and developing a strong board of directors.

  • Adult male whip–poor–will (Caprimulgus vociferus). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 29 No. 1 (2011)

    This issue contains papers on the varied anthropogenic causes of wild bird mortality; euthanasia in wildlife rehabilitation; biodiversity; environmental enrichment for raccoons and corvids; raptor hacking procedures and enclosures; safety of wildlife responders during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill; and an update on the Formula for Nesting Songbirds (FoNS©).

  • Eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 28 No. 2 (2010)

    This issue contains articles about the natural history and rehabilitation of Virginia opossum; nutrition and captive diet information for turtles in rehabilitation; migratory bird mortaility caused by light pollution and the work of the Fatal Light Awareness Program (FLAP); a case study of surgical eye enucleation in an eastern screech-owl; and baseline serum chemistry, hematology, and serology assessment in black bears in British Columbia.

  • Juvenile moose (Alces alces). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan

    Vol. 28 No. 1 (2010)

    This issue contains papers on the minimum recommended temperatures for housing when overwintering birds; a comparative evaluation of nestling bird diets; the use of soy as a base for juvenile bird diets; conflict management and public education about coyotes; a primer on how to write a journal article; a feeding stand for use with hummingbirds in rehabilitation; and results from the 2008 NWRA member survey.

  • Wood ducks (Aix sponsa). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 27 No. 2 (2009)

    This issues contains papers on the rehabilitation of wood ducks; the prevention and treatment of genital injuries in young squirrels; a primer on postmortem examination in waterfowl; bite management and sample submission protocols for working with rabies vector species (RVS); and part three of the NWRA member survey.

  • Red–eyed vireo (vireo olivaceus). Artwork by Chris Kerrigan.

    Vol. 27 No. 1 (2009)

    This issue contains papers on post-release findings and treatment of river otters; a postmortem case-study detailing Cryptococcus in a common loon; the use of an aquarium exhibit for non-releasable shorebirds; the potential for zoonotic disease in rabbits attacked by cats; comments on a case-study comparing a nestling songbird diets; hematological values and body mass for herring gulls; and part two of the NWRA Member Survey.

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